Peer-reviewed papers

Examples of the work that has already been done using the Tanzanian data:

Low risk of death but discontinuation of follow up among people in the national care and treatment programme in Tanzania

Somi et al analysed data from over 88,000 patients from 101 clinics across Tanzania. They found high rates of death and loss to follow up, which both peaked within the first six months. The authors call for further research to determine the reasons for attrition.

Somi G, Keogh SC, Todd J, Kilama B, Wringe A, van den Hombergh J, et al. Low mortality risk but high loss to follow-up among patients in the Tanzanian national HIV care and treatment programme. Trop Med Int Health. 2012 Feb;17(4):497–506.

Effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Kilimanjaro region

Mwendo et al investigated the effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programmes in the Kilimanjaro region of northern Tanzania. They found that the rate of mother-to-child transmission was 9.6% between 2009 and 2012. They concluded that the intrapartum and child chemoprophylaxis components of the programme (that is, medicines given to the mother and child to prevent transmission) were well implemented, with 84% of both mothers and their babies getting full chemoprophylaxis, and effective in reducing mother-to-child transmission.

Mwendo EM, Mtuy TB, Renju J, Rutherford GW, Nondi J, Sichalwe AW, et al. Effectiveness of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programmes in Kilimanjaro region, northern Tanzania. Trop Med Int Health. 2014 Mar;19(3):267–74.

Improvement in mortality and retention among adults on ART in Dodoma.

Tweve et al included data on over 3000 adults initiating ART in Dodoma between 2010 and 2013. They found that mortality and retention in care improved over time, and the authors state that these findings refute the concerns that earlier initiation on ART may lead to lower retention.

Tweve EN, Kayabu D, Nassari NO, Todd J. Improvement in mortality and retention among adult HIV-infected patients in the first 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in Dodoma urban district, Tanzania. Trop Med Int Health. 2015 Jun;20(6):791–6.

Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: Analysis of routinely collected national data

Vanobberghen et al. analysed the records of 121,000 patients who accessed ART with CD4 counts and more than 6 months of follow up. Immune failure rates were three times higher than mortality over the following 6 years.  Only 6% of those who experienced immune failure switched to second line treatment.

Vanobberghen FM, Kilama B, Wringe A, et al. Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: analysis of routinely collected national data. Trop. Med. Int. Heal. 2015;00(00):n/a–n/a. Available at: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/tmi.12507.